My job

60 seconds with professor of midwifery Jayne Marshall

To achieve success, be proactive, patient and persevere, and have the courage to move out of your comfort zone, says professor of midwifery Jayne Marshall. 
jayne

To achieve success, be proactive, patient and persevere, and have the courage to move out of your comfort zone, says professor of midwifery Jayne Marshall

Jayne Marshall trained as a nurse at Guys Hospital in London before starting her midwifery training at Kings College Hospital in 1982. After practising as a midwife in London, she moved into education, working as a midwifery lecturer then associate professor at the University of Nottingham. She took up a post as head of school of midwifery at Kingston University and St Georges University of London in 2014, and in July became the first professor of midwifery at the University of Leicester.

What are your main work responsibilities? To develop and implement

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To achieve success, be proactive, patient and persevere, and have the courage to move out of your comfort zone, says professor of midwifery Jayne Marshall 

jayne
Jayne Marshall’s best lesson from midwifery is treating everyone with the same respect
and standard of care as you would wish for your family and friends.  

Jayne Marshall trained as a nurse at Guy’s Hospital in London before starting her midwifery training at King’s College Hospital in 1982. After practising as a midwife in London, she moved into education, working as a midwifery lecturer then associate professor at the University of Nottingham. She took up a post as head of school of midwifery at Kingston University and St George’s University of London in 2014, and in July became the first professor of midwifery at the University of Leicester. 

What are your main work responsibilities?
To develop and implement an innovative four-year pre-registration master in science midwifery with leadership programme for aspiring leaders of the midwifery profession. 

Who are your clients/patients? 
Future students and childbearing women, their babies and families. The programme is being developed with local maternity service users and staff within the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust. 

What do you love about your job? 
Educating and nurturing the next generation of midwives to reach their full potential, and being part of their continuing professional development. 

What do you find most difficult? 
Saying ‘no’ and finding the time to fit in everything that enthuses me. 

What is your top priority at work?
To develop and implement the four-year programme, and form a good working relationship with the local provider of maternity services.   

How have you developed your skills in this role?
Undertaking leadership training, being a member of numerous midwifery committees, and being the editor and author of a number of research publications and midwifery texts, including Myles Textbook for Midwives.

What has been your most formative career experience?
Being inspired by great midwifery education role models, especially the late Dora Opoku, who initiated my enthusiasm for midwifery and thirst for learning during my nurse training.

What is the best lesson midwifery has taught you? 
The importance of establishing good, trusting relationships with others and treating everyone with the same respect and standard of care as you would wish for yourself and your family and friends.  

What career advice would you give your younger self? 
To achieve success be proactive, patient and persevere, and have the courage to move out of your comfort zone and take risks to rise to the new challenges ahead.     

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