My job

60 Seconds with Parkinson’s disease specialist nurse Jacqueline Young

People with Parkinson’s in hospital need timely medication and education to prevent readmissions, says Jacqueline Young.
Jacqueline Young

People with Parkinsons in hospital need timely medication and education to prevent readmissions, says Jacqueline Young

Jacqueline Young qualified as a registered nurse in London in 1988. Married with two teenage children, she worked in the community for 18 years before moving, 2 years ago, to her current role as a Parkinsons disease specialist nurse in a secondary care setting in Cambridge. The post was created with the aim of ensuring all people with Parkinsons receive their medication on time.

What are your main work responsibilities?

To review all people with Parkinsons admitted to hospital to ensure medication is prescribed correctly. I also assess people in A&E and try to prevent hospital admission. Education of patients in hospital is important to prevent readmission for common problems such as aspiration pneumonia.

What do you love about your job?

Working in

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People with Parkinson’s in hospital need timely medication and education to prevent readmissions, says Jacqueline Young

Jacqueline Young qualified as a registered nurse in London in 1988. Married with two teenage children, she worked in the community for 18 years before moving, 2 years ago, to her current role as a Parkinson’s disease specialist nurse in a secondary care setting in Cambridge. The post was created with the aim of ensuring all people with Parkinson’s receive their medication on time. 

What are your main work responsibilities? 

To review all people with Parkinson’s admitted to hospital to ensure medication is prescribed correctly. I also assess people in A&E and try to prevent hospital admission. Education of patients in hospital is important to prevent readmission for common problems such as aspiration pneumonia.

What do you love about your job?

Working in partnership with those with Parkinson’s, their families and other health professionals to make a difference and improve quality of life. And being part of a dynamic and forward-thinking team.

What do you find most difficult?

The limitations in treatment for advanced care stages, and having to say there is nothing more invasive we can do.

What is your top priority at work?

Ensuring people with Parkinson’s are managed correctly while in hospital, and raising awareness of Parkinson’s and how to manage the condition.

How have you developed your skills in this role?

Initially through shadowing consultants with an interest in Parkinson’s, then completing the Parkinson’s course and attending study days. I have learned from people with the condition, gaining insights into how they feel and cope.

What has been your most formative career experience?

Completing the non-medical nurse prescribing course in 2008. This enabled me to look at the whole person.

What will be your next career move?

To finally finish my master's, which has been on hold for too many years, and to produce the admission avoidance booklet I have had in draft format for over a year. 

What career advice would you give your younger self?

Believe more in yourself and speak up for what you believe in. Back up your ideas with research and hard facts, and take every opportunity to work with other health professions to learn from them.    

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