My job

60 seconds with nursing lecturer Maggie Bennett

It's not what you do but how you make others feel that is important, says nursing lecturer Maggie Bennett. 
Maggie Bennett

It's not what you do, but how you make others feel that is important, says nursing lecturer Maggie Bennett

Give people your time, says Maggie Bennett.

Maggie Bennett qualified as a registered nurse in Birmingham in 1992, working initially in intensive care. Two years later she moved back to Northern Ireland, where she continued to work in intensive care, then pursued a career in community nursing and practice education. She took up her current post as a lecturer in the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Queens University Belfast in 2013. She and her husband Tony have three daughters.

What are your main work responsibilities?

I co-ordinate and teach a module for second-year undergraduate nursing students about the pathophysiology of common diseases, patient experience and the associated nursing care.

How did you get your job?

I am indebted to the

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It's not what you do, but how you make others feel that is important, says nursing lecturer Maggie Bennett 


Give people your time, says Maggie Bennett.

Maggie Bennett qualified as a registered nurse in Birmingham in 1992, working initially in intensive care. Two years later she moved back to Northern Ireland, where she continued to work in intensive care, then pursued a career in community nursing and practice education. She took up her current post as a lecturer in the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Queen’s University Belfast in 2013. She and her husband Tony have three daughters.

What are your main work responsibilities? 

I co-ordinate and teach a module for second-year undergraduate nursing students about the pathophysiology of common diseases, patient experience and the associated nursing care.

How did you get your job?  

I am indebted to the mentors who have guided me throughout my career, whose time and constructive feedback has enabled me to grow and develop professionally.

Who are your clients/patients?

Undergraduate nursing students and post-registration students returning to university for CPD courses.

What do you love about your job?

My amazing students. I love visiting them on placement and seeing the difference they make to the lives of patients and their families.

What do you find most difficult?

The first five minutes of a lecture, worrying if I know enough. I learn something new every day.

What is your top priority at work?

Caring for students and hopefully inspiring them to learn.

How have you developed your skills in this role?

I have observed and worked alongside other experienced lecturers, learning so much from their practice. I also studied biochemistry and pharmacology at university, and my science background has helped me immensely in my nursing career.

What has been your most formative career experience?

Seeing the trust that patients and their families have placed in me.

What will be your next career move?

Achieving my doctorate in education.

What is the best lesson nursing has taught you?

It is not what you do, but how you make others feel that is important. Giving people your time is often the most important thing of all.

What career advice would you give your younger self?

Believe in yourself. You can make a difference every day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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