My job

60 seconds with mental health nursing lecturer Nutmeg Hallett 

Teaching students how to prevent violence and abuse in healthcare settings is a varied and rewarding role


Lecturer Nutmeg Hallett wouldn't change a thing about her job.

Teaching students how to prevent violence and abuse in healthcare settings is a varied and rewarding role, says mental health nursing lecturer Nutmeg Hallett 

Nutmeg Hallett is a lecturer in mental health nursing at the University of Birmingham and has published research papers on violence in healthcare settings. She started her career as a staff nurse at Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust and qualified as a mental health nurse in 2009. In 2012 she undertook a PhD at St Andrew’s Healthcare and the University of Northampton, with a project exploring violence prevention in secure mental health hospital settings. 

What are your main work responsibilities?  
Leading modules in mental health nursing and research methods within the university’s risk, abuse and violence research programme. 

How did you get your job?  
After qualifying as a nurse from the University of Birmingham, I kept in touch with the lecturers and went into the university to teach ad hoc sessions. As soon as a role became available, I applied. 

Who are your clients/patients? 
Pre-registration undergraduate and post-registration postgraduate nursing students. 

What do you love about your job? 
The variety of responsibilities that I have, and the autonomy the role affords me.

What do you find most difficult? 
Fitting in everything that I want to do. 

What is your top priority at work?
Ensuring our students have the skills and knowledge they need to be future researchers and leaders.

How have you developed your skills in this role? 
I work with fantastic people from whom I have learned a great deal. 

What has been your most formative career experience? 
Working as a ward nurse at a mental health trust provided me with the skills and knowledge to educate and research.

If you hadn’t become a nurse, what would you have done instead? 
I was a shopkeeper for a while. Maybe I would have kept doing that.

What will be your next career move? 
I make plans but life seems to have other ideas, so they rarely come to fruition. I’m happy with the way things have worked out so I’m not complaining.

What is the best lesson nursing has taught you? 
People always have a reason for doing what they do, even if it isn’t always obvious. If you find out what that reason is, it is much easier to empathise with the person.

What career advice would you give your younger self? 
Don’t change a thing!

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