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60 seconds with haematology specialist nurse Nasser Roheemun 

Nursing has taught me to embrace every challenge – you never know where it will lead, advises haematology specialist nurse manager Nasser Roheemun 

Nursing has taught me to embrace every challenge – you never know where it will lead, advises haematology specialist nurse manager Nasser Roheemun 


Nasser Roheemun: the most difficult part of my job is the bureaucracy.

Nasser Roheemun is haematology specialist nurse manager at the George Marsh Centre for sickle cell and thalassaemia at St Ann’s Hospital in north London. He was a finalist in the community nursing category of the RCNi Nurse Awards 2018. The unique home-based treatment model he leads for sickle cell disease has improved the lives of hundreds of patients who previously having regular hospital stays. Mr Roheemun trained as a nurse at City, University of London, qualifying in 1994. His previous roles include haematology ward manager at North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust in London and specialist community nurse. He has a master’s degree in health sciences and is married with five children. 

What are your main responsibilities?  
I lead a team of specialist nurses who manage a wide range of highly specialised and sensitive clinical services for sickle cell and thalassaemia, the inherited haemoglobin disease that is highly prevalent in north London.  

Who are your clients/patients?
Patients with sickle cell disease and thalassaemia.

What do you love about your job? 
Being able to offer a flexible schedule to my patients means they can fit their regular clinic appointments around the demands of their jobs or studies.

What do you find most difficult? 
Too much bureaucracy. 

What is your top priority at work?
Ensuring minimum disruption to patients’ daily lives when organising their appointments and/or treatment. 

How have you developed your skills in this role? 
Working closely with consultant haematologists at North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust, and networking with colleagues in the same speciality. 

What has been your most formative career experience? 
During my role as sickle cell and thalassaemia centre manager in 2013, I was invited to be a guest speaker at the annual review day for the NHS sickle cell and thalassaemia screening programme, which offers antenatal and newborn screening. 

If you hadn’t become a nurse, what would you have done instead? 
An accountant.

What will be your next career move? 
To become a haemoglobinopathy consultant nurse.

What is the best lesson nursing has taught you? 
Don’t be afraid to take on a challenge, you never know what doors it could open for you. And never stop learning because you will never know it all.

What career advice would you give your younger self? 
Become a nurse and enjoy this fulfilling career.
 

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