My job

60 seconds with consultant nurse in continence care Karen Logan

Treat people as you would like to be treated and access specialist training as early as possible in your nursing career, says consultant nurse in continence care Karen Logan.  

Treat people as you would like to be treated and access specialist training as early as possible in your nursing career, says consultant nurse in continence care Karen Logan


Former Nursing Standard Nurse of the Year Karen Logan, who recently received the RCN
Wales Nurse of the Year Awards 2016 lifetime achievement award. 

Karen Logan trained at Cardiff University Hospital of Wales, qualifying in 1981. In a career spanning more than 30 years, her clinical roles have included clinical nurse specialist in incontinence and manager of integrated continence services. A nurse consultant since 2004, her current role is consultant nurse, continence care, and head of continence services at Aneurin Bevan University Health Board in Wales. She was named Nursing Standard Nurse of the Year in 2008, and last year was awarded a lifetime achievement award at the RCN Wales Nurse of the Year Awards 2016. 

What are your main work responsibilities? 

I lead the nurse-led continence service, working with a team of specialist nurses to transform continence services across the health board.

How did you get your job?

Through ongoing professional development, including gaining a Master’s degree, and by advancing my practice and working my way up within the incontinence speciality.

Who are your clients/patients?

People who experience bladder and bowel incontinence problems.

What do you love about your job?

The diversity of the consultant role, which is underpinned by expert clinical practice, leadership, education, research and strategic service development. The variety of the role gives me great job satisfaction, and I love being able to make a different to the quality of people’s lives.

What do you find most difficult?

Managing conflict is a weakness of mine.

What is your top priority at work?

Improving patient care, and influencing quality and safety in continence and catheter care across an integrated health board.

How have you developed your skills in this role?

Through ongoing personal and professional development within the speciality, attending conferences and leadership programmes, and working in collaboration with other agencies and universities.

What has been your most formative career experience?

Working as a state-enrolled nurse. The hands-on approach gave me the best grounding: it felt like an apprenticeship in nursing.

If you hadn’t become a nurse, what would you have done instead?

I would have been an artist.

What is the best lesson nursing has taught you?

To treat people as I would like to be treated myself.

What career advice would you give your younger self?

Access higher education and specialist training as early as possible in your career. 

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