My job

60 seconds with community pathways lead Jo Boyd

Jo Boyd qualified in 1994 at Royal Berkshire Hospital in Reading. She is currently an advanced nurse practitioner (ANP) and the community pathways services lead at Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Previously she was worked as a sister in an acute assessment unit, a practice nurse for the Army Primary Healthcare Service and an ANP in an out of hours service and an urgent care centre. She is married with three children.

Jo Boyd qualified in 1994 at Royal Berkshire Hospital in Reading. She is currently an advanced nurse practitioner (ANP) and the community pathways services lead at Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Previously she was worked as a sister in an acute assessment unit, a practice nurse for the Army Primary Healthcare Service and an ANP in an out of hours service and an urgent care centre. She is married with three children.

Jo_Boyd©CB
Picture: Chris Balcombe

What are your main work responsibilities?

Assessing, diagnosing and treating patients suspected to have deep vein thrombosis (DVT).  I also manage a community intravenous therapy and acute urinary retention service.

How did you get your job?

I recognised that a specialist DVT service was required to ensure outpatients were seen promptly and safely and proposed a new model.

Who are your clients/patients?

Approximately 2,000 adult patients suspected to have DVT are referred annually by GPs, specialist nurses, emergency departments and out-patient services.

What do you love about your job?

Face-to-face contact with patients. Being able to provide a reassuring, safe and effective service is very rewarding. I also enjoy supporting staff to reach their full potential.

What do you find most difficult?

Balancing ever increasing managerial duties with clinical time can be very challenging.

What is your top priority at work?

Ensuring patients have the best possible experience and receive same-day assessment on a safe and effective pathway.

How have you developed your skills in this role?

By undertaking post-graduate training in vascular ultrasound. This guided the development of a nurse-led ultrasound service.

What has been your most formative career experience?

Presenting the Swindon case study at the Toronto meeting of the International Society on Thrombosis was an amazing opportunity to reflect on how far the service had developed.

What will be your next career move?

I will be undertaking a new challenge developing the role of civilian ANPs within the Defence Medical Services.

What career advice would you give your younger self?

Don’t be tough on yourself when things don’t go as expected. Learn from your mistakes as well as your successes.


Jo Boyd won the Community category of the RCNi Nurse Awards 2016 for her role in dramatically improving the assessment and treatment of patients with suspected DVT. Read about her award-winning service here.

For information about the RCNi Nurse Awards 2018 visit rcni.com/nurse-awards

 

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