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60 seconds with carers lead Jodie Deards

Have confidence and believe in yourself, especially when you know changing something will improve patient experience, says carers lead Jodie Deards.
deards

Have confidence and believe in yourself, especially when you know changing something will improve patient experience, says carers lead Jodie Deards

Award winner Jodie Deards.

Jodie Deards, winner of the RCNi Nurse Awards Commitment to Carers category, earned her degree as part of Australias first cohort of university-trained nurses in 1993. She came to the UK on a two-year working holiday in 2000 but stayed. After 10 years in the renal unit at Lister Hospital in Stevenage she took up posts as a community diabetes specialist nurse, practice nurse and community matron.

Her current role as carers lead has brought her back to Lister Hospital, part of East and North Herts NHS Trust. She is 49 years young, married to Grant and has three children aged 16, 14 and 10.

What are your main work responsibilities? Ensuring the trust strategically supports unpaid family

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Have confidence and believe in yourself, especially when you know changing something will improve patient experience, says carers lead Jodie Deards 

deards
Award winner Jodie Deards.

Jodie Deards, winner of the RCNi Nurse Awards Commitment to Carers category, earned her degree as part of Australia’s first cohort of university-trained nurses in 1993. She came to the UK on a two-year working holiday in 2000 but stayed. After 10 years in the renal unit at Lister Hospital in Stevenage she took up posts as a community diabetes specialist nurse, practice nurse and community matron. 

Her current role as carers lead has brought her back to Lister Hospital, part of East and North Herts NHS Trust. She is ’49 years young’, married to Grant and has three children aged 16, 14 and 10.  

What are your main work responsibilities?  
Ensuring the trust strategically supports unpaid family and friend carers by increasing awareness, and supporting staff to identify and signpost for carers. 

How did you get your job?  
My work in the community allowed me to understand what being an unpaid carer means. This job was an opportunity to help them.

Who are your clients/patients?
Staff and patients at Lister Hospital and staff at Mount Vernon Cancer Centre. 

What do you love about your job? 
The variety, being able to make a difference, and hearing positive stories from carers on how they have felt valued by staff.

What do you find most difficult? 
Occasionally I find things frustrating, but if you ask for something with a smile and are genuine, people are more likely to want to help you. 

How have you developed your skills in this role? 
Listening, continually reflecting and learning from others is imperative, especially when trying to drive change. 

What has been your most formative career experience? 
Working in various settings has given me a wealth of experiences and knowledge. Winning the RCNi award for Commitment to Carers was pretty spectacular too.  

What career advice would you give your younger self? 
Have confidence and believe in yourself, especially when you know changing something will improve patient experience. 

You can read more about Jodie's award-winning project here

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