My job

60 seconds with associate professor of nursing Calvin Moorley 

'I want to set up a mentoring system to support black and minority ethnic nurses to achieve their potential,' says associate professor of nursing Calvin Moorley. 

'I want to set up a mentoring system to support black and minority ethnic nurses to achieve their potential,' says associate professor of nursing Calvin Moorley

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Calvin Moorley

After qualifying as an adult nurse from the University of Essex in 1995, Dr Calvin Moorley spent most of his clinical career specialising in intensive care nursing. His academic background is in public health and health promotion, and he is now associate professor for nursing research and diversity in care at London South Bank University. He is also the holder of the Mary Seacole Award for Leadership in Nursing, a judge for the Cavell Nurses’ Trust Awards and a member of the Mary Seacole Awards steering committee. 

What are your main work responsibilities?  
To deliver nursing education and undertake research. I also continue to work in intensive care, providing care for critically ill patients and their families.   

How did you get your job?  
I moved from a clinical to an academic pathway in 2001, doing my teaching qualification at a local college. I was employed by the college for a year before moving to a higher education setting.  

Who are your clients/patients?
Undergraduate to doctoral students, research funders and patients who require intensive care nursing and their families. 

What do you love about your job? 
Helping and supporting patients using my knowledge and experience of health. This symbiotic relationship is the best part of being a nurse.

What do you find most difficult? 
I give so much of myself to others. Saying no is very difficult for me. 

What is your top priority at work?
Patient care and safety, always. 

How have you developed your skills in this role? 
I have had some great mentors, all strong women, including professors Debra Jackson, Carol Baxter and Laura Serrant, and Dame Elizabeth Anionwu, to name just a few. 

What has been your most formative career experience? 
My research focuses on gender, health and culture. Learning to view health through these lenses as a nursing student shaped my career, and helped me give a voice to minority groups. 

If you hadn’t become a nurse, what would you have done instead? 
I love baking so something to do with cake making and decorating.

What will be your next career move? 
Continuing my work around culture, gender and health, and developing an international forum to support transcultural nursing. I also want to set up a mentoring system to support black and minority ethnic nurses to achieve their potential. 

What is the best lesson nursing has taught you? 
Discipline, tolerance and appreciation. 

What career advice would you give your younger self? 
Don’t doubt yourself. You can do whatever you set your mind to, even if you went to school barefoot!

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