My job

60 seconds with adult nursing lecturer Winifred Oluchukwu Eboh

Every role will have its rewards and challenges and provide vital learning opportunities, says adult nursing lecturer Winifred Oluchukwu Eboh.
winifred

Every role will have its rewards and challenges and provide vital learning opportunities, says adult nursing lecturer Winifred Oluchukwu Eboh

Winifred Oluchukwu Eboh qualified as a registered general nurse in 1984 and as a midwife 18 months later. After three years working in midwifery she then spent eight years as a sickle cell and thalassaemia nurse counsellor before taking up a post as a specialist haemoglobinopathy nurse, caring mainly for patients with sickle cell disease. She moved into higher education 17 years ago, completing a PhD in public health in 2004, and is now lecturer in adult nursing at the University of Essex.

What are your main work responsibilities?

Teaching the BSc (Hons) and Masters undergraduate programmes and working with clinical partners to ensure students are supported

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Every role will have its rewards and challenges and provide vital learning opportunities, says adult nursing lecturer Winifred Oluchukwu Eboh

winifred
Winifred Oluchukwu Eboh says advice to her younger self
would be 'nothing ventured, nothing gained'.

Winifred Oluchukwu Eboh qualified as a registered general nurse in 1984 and as a midwife 18 months later. After three years working in midwifery she then spent eight years as a sickle cell and thalassaemia nurse counsellor before taking up a post as a specialist haemoglobinopathy nurse, caring mainly for patients with sickle cell disease. She moved into higher education 17 years ago, completing a PhD in public health in 2004, and is now lecturer in adult nursing at the University of Essex.

What are your main work responsibilities?

Teaching the BSc (Hons) and Master’s undergraduate programmes and working with clinical partners to ensure students are supported in the practice environment. I also liaise with universities overseas, including in Australia and Asia, to organise international placements for nursing students.

Who are your clients/patients?

Nursing students, clinical partners and other universities.

What do you love about your job?

Seeing students make the journey from undergraduate to graduate nurse and going on to contribute to the nursing profession. When I receive positive feedback about former students, I feel like my job just gets better and better.

What do you find most difficult?

Seeing students struggle to complete their course. Some experience incredibly challenging life events which can prevent them from completing their programme.

What is your top priority at work?

Working directly with students and keeping up to date with my continuing professional development.

How have you developed your skills in this role?

Undertaking research, and collaborating with colleagues in higher education and clinical practice, both nationally and internationally.

What has been your most formative career experience?

Every role I have undertaken has had its rewards and challenges, and provided me with vital learning that has impacted positively on future roles.

What will be your next career move?

To continue progressing through academia and helping to shape the next generation of nurses, ultimately reaching the top of my profession.

What career advice would you give your younger self?

Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

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