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Inspiring clinical leaders to facilitate culture change 

A new programme from the Foundation of Nursing Studies aims to support front-line staff in developing their leadership and facilitation skills to effect culture change 

A new programme from the Foundation of Nursing Studies aims to support front-line staff in developing their leadership and facilitation skills to effect culture change 


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Clinical leaders who want to improve their workplace culture are the focus of a new programme from the Foundation of Nursing Studies (FoNS).  

The Inspire Improvement programme, supported by the Burdett Trust for Nursing, provides successful applicants with a bursary of up £3,000 to support their development. 

Greater insight

Applicants should be a direct line manager, such as ward sister, matron, community team leader or care home manager, and have insight into their leadership style and skills.

‘We’re looking for leaders who really want to facilitate culture change and continuous improvement,’ says Jo Odell, practice development facilitator at FoNS, who believes that taking part will have benefits for both individuals and their organisations.

‘Participants will be able to expand their knowledge and skills in facilitating culture change,’ she says. ‘They will be able to influence team-working, demonstrating to other leaders in their workplace what’s possible.’

Everyone who takes part in the 12-month programme automatically becomes an Improvement Fellow. ‘We’re looking to set up a network of people so we can continue to support them as time goes on,’ says Ms Odell. 

Workplace visits

Participants will take part in six learning and development days, designed to develop their skills as facilitators. There will also be workplace visits and dedicated support, with feedback on issues such as current leadership style and useful tools to create improvements. 

Fellows will also be expected to carry out evaluation and actively share the outcomes of their work, helping to spread learning throughout their organisations and more widely. 

The first cohort of between ten and 12 people will begin the programme in February 2018. Learning will be tailored to participants’ needs, but Ms Odell says it is not just a learning event. 

‘We won’t be talking at them, and will expect them to take action,’ says Ms Odell.

New approaches

‘We want to see them putting their learning into practice, whether this is with their team, a specific project, or using new approaches to engage with staff or patients. They should also be able to articulate what they want from the programme. 

‘Everyone talks about culture, and how it means happy patients and staff when it’s effective,’ she says. ‘But this can be a tricky issue, and people need help to do something about it. 

‘That’s what makes this programme so different. It’s also why we’re so keen to work with front-line staff – they are the ones who can have the biggest influence on patient care.’ 

Applications are open until 6 November. Click here to find out more. 


Lynne Pearce is a freelance health journalist 
 

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