Careers

60 Seconds with community urgent care nurse Mike Paynter

A 34-year veteran of emergency care, Mike Paynter says today's challenges are the most profound he has seen
Mike Paynter

A 34-year veteran of emergency care, Mike Paynter says today's challenges are the most profund he has seen

Mike Paynter began his career in emergency departments in London where, during the 1980s, he responded to major incidents such as the Kings Cross fire. Now consultant nurse for community urgent care in Somerset, he is married to an emergency nurse and they have twin teenage boys

What are your main work responsibilities?

Helping to steer my NHS trust through changes associated with delivering community urgent care. Current challenges facing emergency and urgent care are the most profound I have seen in 34 years of practice.

How did you get your job?

I was clear on my speciality from the start and followed an established route into increasingly senior clinical positions.

Who are your clients/patients?

The patients are a

...

A 34-year veteran of emergency care, Mike Paynter says today's challenges are the most profund he has seen   

Mike Paynter began his career in emergency departments in London where, during the 1980s, he responded to  major incidents such as the King’s Cross fire. Now consultant nurse for community urgent care in Somerset, he is married to an emergency nurse and they have twin teenage boys

What are your main work responsibilities?  

Helping to steer my NHS trust through changes associated with delivering community urgent care. Current challenges facing emergency and urgent care are the most profound I have seen in 34 years of practice.  

How did you get your job?  

I was clear on my speciality from the start and followed an established route into increasingly senior clinical positions.    

Who are your clients/patients?

The patients are a broad and mixed group requiring urgent and emergency care. Presentations vary from minor injuries to life threating, paediatric to elderly, psychiatric to obstetric.    

What do you love about your job?

Seeing junior staff fulfil their potential.

What do you find most difficult?

National pressures on emergency care are having a profound impact on front line staff.     

What is your top priority at work?

Supporting the clinical team to do the outstanding job they do every day. With a significant percentage of senior nurses planning to retire over the next ten years, ensuring succession planning is a priority.  

How have you developed your skills in this role?

I have worked with inspirational clinicians and people who lead by example. I hope I have absorbed some of their qualities!

What was your formative career experience?

When I started there were no national guidelines or truly evidenced practice. As a junior nurse it was exciting to take part in projects that led to the development of the Resuscitation Council and the Advanced Trauma Life Support programme. 

What will be your next career move?

Supporting and defending clinicians facing allegations of poor practice interests me.

What career advice would you give your younger self?

Don’t be impatient – changes do happen. In the NHS they occur slowly.

 

 

Want to read more?

Subscribe for unlimited access

Enjoy 1 month's access for £1 and get:

  • Full access to nursing standard.com and the Nursing Standard app
  • Monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs