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Platinum Jubilee: Queen honours nurses’ selfless pandemic response

The honours list gives royal recognition to the incredible public service of nursing staff and other healthcare professionals from across the UK

The honours list gives royal recognition to the incredible public service of nursing staff and other healthcare professionals from across the UK

A nurse who returned to the COVID-19 front line after her husband died from the virus has been recognised in the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee Honour’s list.

Maria Hewitt, a nurse from Paisley, Scotland, was honoured with a British Empire Medal (BEM) alongside dozens of nurses and healthcare staff who have been named in celebration of Queen Elizabeth II’s 70 years on the throne.

The list gives royal recognition to incredible public service of people from across the UK, and includes many nurses honoured for their determined and

The honours list gives royal recognition to the incredible public service of nursing staff and other healthcare professionals from across the UK

Some of the nurses named in the 2022 Queen’s Platinum Jubilee honours
Some of the nurses named in the 2022 Queen’s Platinum Jubilee honours (for full list, see box below)

A nurse who returned to the COVID-19 front line after her husband died from the virus has been recognised in the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee Honour’s list.

Maria Hewitt, a nurse from Paisley, Scotland, was honoured with a British Empire Medal (BEM) alongside dozens of nurses and healthcare staff who have been named in celebration of Queen Elizabeth II’s 70 years on the throne.

The list gives royal recognition to incredible public service of people from across the UK, and includes many nurses honoured for their determined and selfless response to the pandemic.

Others, such as deaf nurse Joanne Mohammed – a champion of disability rights – have been recognised for a career where they have made a real difference to care, public health and patients’ lives.

‘I felt it was what my husband would want me to do’

Maria Hewitt, who qualified as a nurse in 2019, has been awarded a British Empire Medal

Ms Hewitt, who qualified as a nurse just three years ago in 2019 after a long career in the police, lost her husband John to COVID-19 in June 2020 after 17 years of marriage.

She was working in a policing role for the Home Office at the time, but returned to the NHS front line at NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde Board (NHSGGC), and then worked as a vaccinator to honour her husband’s memory.

‘I was in the absolute depths of grief. It was my lowest moment, but I felt I had to do something to help,’ she said.

‘Millions had died and every member of NHS staff was working so hard to help. I felt it was what my husband would want me to do.’

Although she said the honour is bittersweet as she cannot share it with John, she added: ‘I’m delighted for everyone at NHSGGC, and for all those older students who are thinking of getting into nursing. It’s a wonderful career and I’d heartily recommend it.’

Joanne Mohammed was awarded a British Empire Medal

Working to drive forward inclusivity for staff and patients

Joanne Mohammed, a nurse at Bolton NHS Foundation Trust, has been awarded a British Empire Medal (BEM) for services to nursing and disability awareness.

Having become deaf at the age of seven, Ms Mohammed has turned her situation in to a positive by using her experiences to raise awareness of disabilities and to campaign for inclusivity. She is working to secure transparent face masks for clinical settings to help boost communication.

‘Throughout my life I have been met with barriers, so to be recognised by Her Majesty is special,’ she said.

‘I now have a platform to talk about disability and I want to show that you can be deaf and have a career and go on to achieve.’

‘Never been prouder to be a nurse’

England’s chief nurse Ruth May becomes a Dame
Picture: Barney Newman

England’s chief nurse Ruth May receives a Damehood for services to nursing, midwifery and the NHS, along with the south west’s regional chief nurse Susan Doheny who is awarded a Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) for services to nursing.

Ms May, who qualified as a nurse in 1985, said she had ‘never been prouder to be a nurse.’

She said: ‘I am proud to receive this award and I do so on behalf of the nursing and midwifery professions who use their expertise to care for us throughout every stage of our lives in hospitals, in our homes and in the community each and every day.

‘While I have always known how remarkable our health and care professions are, the pandemic has shone an even brighter light on their extraordinary work.’

Sue Doheny added: ‘I am humbled by this extraordinary recognition. I accept it not for myself but on behalf of all the nurses, midwives, students and those in the caring professions across the South West. When I receive the award in person, I shall think of them all in that moment.’

Leading community care

Stephanie Lawrence received an MBE

District nurse Stephanie Lawrence receives an MBE (Member of the British Empire) for her role as a community nurse in Yorkshire for more than 35 years.

Ms Lawrence, who works at Leeds Community Care NHS Trust, is responsible for leading community-based nursing and therapy care across Leeds, with the aim of keeping people well at home and outside of a hospital setting.

The executive director of Nursing and Allied Health Professionals for her trust, she also holds the same role for the Leeds GP Confederation, overseeing nurses and therapy professionals across both GP practices and community care.

‘To nurse someone in their own home is a great privilege,’ she said.

‘This award is for all those community nurses in Leeds, and across the country, who go the extra mile every day and night to make sure that people can remain in their own homes.’

Dedication to education

John Unsworth received an Order of the British Empire

Professor John Unsworth, chair of the Queen’s Nursing Insitutue (QNI) is recognised with an Order of the British Empire (OBE) for his work in supporting community nursing and nurse education.

The QNI's chief executive Dr Crystal Oldman CBE said of him: ‘For almost a decade he has also chaired all the QNI education and practice advisory groups, overseeing the development of standards to support a range of post-registration community nursing education programmes.

‘His exceptional commitment to the highest standards of nursing care in the community is evident and his work at the QNI is both is entirely voluntary and delivered alongside a very senior role in higher education, which makes it even more extraordinary.'

True essence of nursing

RCN president Denise Chaffer congratulated all the nurses recognised in today’s birthday honours.

‘Particularly in this Jubilee year, all of those recognised in the Queen’s Birthday Honours should be proud to have been acknowledged in this way,’ she said.

‘They represent the true essence of the nursing workforce, wherever they may work, who continue to demonstrate incredible skill and professionalism every day of the week.’

Council chair at the Nursing and Midwifery Council Sir David Warren added: ‘Since joining as chair of the council, I’ve been so impressed by the incredible work all our nursing and midwifery professionals do.’

The nurses named in the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee Honours list

Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire

Ruth May, chief nursing officer for England, NHS England and NHS Improvement. For services to nursing, midwifery and the NHS

Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE)

Jacqueline Reilly

Jacqueline Reilly, professor of infection and prevention control, Glasgow Caledonian University. For services to healthcare and public health.

Officers of the Order of the British Empire (OBE)

Sean Duggan

Sean Duggan, chief executive of the Mental Health Network, NHS Confederation. For services to public health.

Elizabeth Fenton, deputy chief nurse, Health Education England. For services to the nursing profession.

John Unsworth, chair of the Queen’s Nursing Institute (QNI). For services to community nursing and community nurse education.

Members of the Order of the British Empire (MBE)

Sharon Aldridge-Bent

Sharon Aldridge-Bent, director of nursing programmes – leadership, QNI. For services to community nursing.

Susan Doheny, regional chief nurse for South West, NHS England and NHS Improvement. For services to nursing.

Angela Knight Jackson, deputy director for nursing professional development, NHS England and NHS Improvement. For services to the NHS, specifically to the nursing and midwifery workforce.

Susan Doheny

Tinuade Jegede (Tina Jegede), lead nurse for care home quality, standards and assurance, London Borough of Islington. For services to social care.

Stephanie Lawrence, executive director, nursing and allied health professionals, Leeds Community Healthcare NHS Trust. For services to district nursing.

Suman Raj Shrestha

Suman Raj Shrestha, professional lead RCN and nurse consultant in critical care, Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust. For services to critical care nursing.

Maura Teager, lead governor, University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust. For services to the nursing profession and to the community in Derby.

Yemisi Osho, Queen’s nurse. For services to the NHS and to the community in the London Borough of Waltham Forest, particularly during COVID-19.

Medallists of the Order of the British Empire (BEM)

Alacoque Teresa McCaffrey

Elizabeth Gray, nurse at East Suffolk and North Essex NHS Foundation Trust. For services to the NHS.

Maria Hewitt, dermatology staff nurse at NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. For services to the NHS during COVID-19.

Alacoque Teresa McCaffrey, occupational health nurse, Western Health and Social Care Trust. For services to occupational health, particularly during COVID-19.

Anne Trotter

Joanne Mohammed, nurse at the Royal Bolton Hospital. For services to nursing and to disability awareness.

Wendy Kimberley, community nurse at Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. For charitable services to the NHS through the Portraits for Heroes Initiative during COVID-19.

Anne Trotter, registered children’s and adult nurse, assistant director of education and standards, Nursing and Midwifery Council. For services to public health.

Royal Red Cross

Royal Navy

Lt Frederick Joseph Miller

Army

Lt Col Lynn Strachan Adam ARRC

Lt Col Margaret Rose Kathleen Durrant TD, VR

Royal Air Force

Wg Cdr Eleanor Catherine Hereford

Gp Capt Diane Wendy Lamb

Wg Cdr Nina Louise Rose



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