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Nurse-led project aims to reduce dehydration in older people

University of West London I-Hydrate project offers advice on hydration in nursing homes
Nursing home residents enjoying a drink

University of West London I-Hydrate project offers advice on hydration in nursing homes

Free resources developed as part of a nurse-led project to tackle dehydration in older people could help improve care.

A lack of fluid affects patients physical and mental health, and can lead to confusion, dizziness and serious health implications, such as urinary tract infections.

The I-Hydrate research project, developed by researchers from the University of West London (UWL), aims to optimise hydration in nursing homes to decrease the ill effects of dehydration.

A downloadable I-Hydrate resource pack , including videos and training ideas, has been made available. This includes materials for staff, such as a list of questions to ask patients about hydration

University of West London I-Hydrate project offers advice on hydration in nursing homes

Nursing home residents enjoying a cup of tea
Picture: John Houlihan

Free resources developed as part of a nurse-led project to tackle dehydration in older people could help improve care.

A lack of fluid affects patients’ physical and mental health, and can lead to confusion, dizziness and serious health implications, such as urinary tract infections.

The I-Hydrate research project, developed by researchers from the University of West London (UWL), aims to optimise hydration in nursing homes to decrease the ill effects of dehydration.

downloadable I-Hydrate resource pack, including videos and training ideas, has been made available. This includes materials for staff, such as a list of questions to ask patients about hydration and a staff guide to protecting drinking times.

Practical ways to help make drinking easier for older people

UWL professor of healthcare epidemiology Jennie Wilson said the team looked at practical ways to help make drinking easier.

‘For patients, we highlighted the need for light, easy to hold cups and a greater choice of drinks; for caregivers, we produced resources that remind teams to offer drinks regularly and keep an eye on a patient’s intake,’ he said.

Professor Wilson hopes the resources will be picked up by care teams in London and further afield.

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