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Give antibiotics for UTI to lessen sepsis risk

Antibiotics should be given when urinary tract infection is suspected in older people to lessen the risk of sepsis and the need for hospital admission

Antibiotics should be given when urinary tract infection is suspected in older people to lessen the risk of sepsis and the need for hospital admission

Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common bacterial infection in older people. The spectrum of UTI ranges from a mild self-limiting infection to severe sepsis, with a mortality rate of 20-40%.

The incidence of sepsis increases with age, and UTI in older men is especially likely to be severe. Both sexes develop UTI in older age. In people over the age of 70 it is still slightly more common in women, but nothing like the overwhelming susceptibility of females in the younger population.

The diagnosis

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