News

CPR decisions: what the updated ReSPECT form means for nurses

Resuscitation Council UK says the form will support informed emergency treatment decisions
Patient-centred discussions about emergency treatment

Resuscitation Council UK says the form is more patient-centred to support informed decision-making

The Resuscitation Council UK has updated its process for logging discussions with patients about emergency treatment and whether cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) should be attempted.

Nurses and healthcare professionals in England and Scotland already use the ReSPECT (Recommended Summary Plan for Emergency Care and Treatment) form to document discussions with patients about these options.

ReSPECT form documents discussions with patients about CPR

The Resuscitation Council UK (RCUK) has revised the form, making it more patient-centred and adding more prompts for healthcare professionals to explain clinical decisions.

RCUK chair of the ReSPECT subcommittee Zoe Fritz said there are a number of misconceptions about when to attempt CPR, so it is crucial to have conversations that aim for shared understanding between

Resuscitation Council UK says the form is more patient-centred to support informed decision-making


Picture: iStock

The Resuscitation Council UK has updated its process for logging discussions with patients about emergency treatment and whether cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) should be attempted.

Nurses and healthcare professionals in England and Scotland already use the ReSPECT (Recommended Summary Plan for Emergency Care and Treatment) form to document discussions with patients about these options. 

ReSPECT form documents discussions with patients about CPR

The Resuscitation Council UK (RCUK) has revised the form, making it more patient-centred and adding more prompts for healthcare professionals to explain clinical decisions.

RCUK chair of the ReSPECT subcommittee Zoe Fritz said there are a number of misconceptions about when to attempt CPR, so it is crucial to have conversations that aim for shared understanding between the professional and patient.

‘By doing so, any misunderstandings can be addressed and professionals can ensure that any recommendations made are based on what’s important to the patient.’

Prompts aim to ensure patients understand emergency treatment options

When a ReSPECT form is completed, it stays with the patient so other healthcare professionals will be able to make a quick decision about the best way to treat them.

The new form includes:

  • Wording to stress the importance of recording a patient’s personal circumstances and their understanding of emergency treatment options.
  • Visual aids to help patients understand treatment options.
  • A prompt for healthcare professionals to record clearly clinical decisions if they were made without the patient's input.
  • A reminder that if a patient lacks capacity, a conversation must take place with family and/or legal proxy.
  • A statement that any decisions made are not legally binding.
  • A section for the patient, family member or legal proxy to sign to demonstrate they have been involved in the decisions made.

      Form supports advanced decision-making

      RCUK director of clinical and service development Sue Hampshire said the changes were made based on feedback from patients, families and healthcare professionals.

      ‘The new form will support better conversations and well-informed decision-making in advance.’


      Find out more


      In other news

      Sign up to continue reading for FREE

      OR

      Subscribe for unlimited access

      Enjoy 1 month's access for £1 and get:

      • Full access to nursingmanagement.com
      • Bi-monthly digital edition
      • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
      • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
      • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal

      This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

      Jobs