My job

Connecting with people is what I enjoy most

EMIS Health head of customer operations Ian Bailey explains why patients can benefit from technological developments in healthcare services.
Ian_Bailey

EMIS Health head of customer operations Ian Bailey explains why patients can benefit from technological developments in healthcare services.

What is your job?

EMIS Health provides the health sector with products and services, such as clinical management systems and analytics tools, and I am responsible for overseeing the journeys of community, childrens or mental health service customers who purchase them. I am also clinical lead for the market sector, which means I am responsible for ensuring the clinical needs of our customers are met in the products we develop while maintaining clinical safety and effectiveness.

Why did you become a nurse?

When I was at school, I volunteered as a care assistant in a nursing home. One of the things I most enjoyed was the interaction with the residents and their families, and I saw how the dedication, compassion and

...

EMIS Health head of customer operations Ian Bailey explains why patients can benefit from technological developments in healthcare services.

Ian_Bailey

What is  your job?

EMIS Health provides the health sector with products and services, such as clinical management systems and analytics tools, and I am responsible for overseeing the journeys of community, children’s or mental health service customers who purchase them. I am also clinical lead for the market sector, which means I am responsible for ensuring the clinical needs of our customers are met in the products we develop while maintaining clinical safety and effectiveness.

Why did you become a nurse?

When I was at school, I volunteered as a care assistant in a nursing home. One of the things I most enjoyed was the interaction with the residents and their families, and I saw how the dedication, compassion and knowledge of the care staff improved the residents’ quality of life. I was also interested in the nursing duties, such as medication administration, wound care and end of life care, and wanted to combine these with the compassionate approach I had witnessed.

What do you enjoy most about your job?

Connecting with people, helping them share their practices, resolving problems and, most of all, seeing potential new ways to improve patient outcomes.

How and where have you developed leadership skills?

I worked in the NHS for almost 20 years before joining the private sector. Throughout this time, I undertook many roles. I worked with diverse patient populations and led several community services, each with its own challenges and experiences that have enabled me to develop my leadership skills. I also took part in some healthcare leadership development courses.

How does your current job make use of your leadership skills?

There are two main elements to my current role. The first is internal leadership, which is leadership of the company staff, and its product development, clinical safety and governance. The second is external leadership, which involves customers and national bodies, as well as the clinical and clinical informatics agendas in healthcare.

What is your greatest challenge?

One challenge is variation in uptake of technology in healthcare services. Many organisations, services, clinicians and patients benefit from technology that improves outcomes. However, there are significant areas of healthcare, sometimes even in an organisation or service, where uptake of technology varies widely or where it is not used at all. Supporting clinicians to see and embrace the potential benefits of technology, and break from traditional ways of working, is not always easy.

What would you change if you could?

I would love to see all clinicians use the best technology available to deliver the highest quality, most efficient care to patients. I would also like patients to have full access to their electronic health records and to use them to improve their health.

What inspires you?

The standard of service revealed during one-to-one interactions between clinicians and patients. It is easy to focus on negative stories about the NHS, but I am constantly reminded that overall the level of care we receive from the NHS is second to none.

What achievement makes you most proud?

Graduating with a first-class honour’s degree in nursing and becoming a Queen’s Nurse. 

What makes a good nurse leader?

Strong personal values, the ability to reflect on practice, and the ability to listen to and support those around you. As clinicians, we are used to using these skills with patients, but we should also use them with colleagues.

Want to read more?

Subscribe for unlimited access

Enjoy 1 month's access for £1 and get:

  • Full access to nursingmanagement.com
  • Bi-monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs