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The Charlie Gard case: the importance of professional ethical reasoning

When it comes to caring for children with complex needs, ethical reasoning must exist beyond gut feelings and intuition. 
Connie Yates and Chris Gard

When it comes to caring for children with complex needs, ethical reasoning must exist beyond gut feelings and intuition

The media coverage of Charlie Gard will likely have challenged all nurses and healthcare professionals to consider their moral views, as professionals and as individuals.

Perhaps considering whether it is right for Charlie’s parents, and now the courts, to consider an experimental therapy when his medical team argue that it is in his best interests to receive only palliative treatment.

At the heart of this decision is an infant who cannot breathe for himself, open his eyes, move his limbs, suffers seizures and is cognitively impaired to such an extent that his doctors can only identify that he feels pain and has no chance of any meaningful recovery. It would be wrong to assume

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