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COVID-19: nurse dies after redeploying to intensive care

Terry Boston-Marsh, a nurse and senior theatre practitioner at Kent and Canterbury Hospital, remembered for ‘calm, kind nature’
Nurse and senior theatre practitioner Terry Boston-Marsh, 54, died after redeploying to the intensive care unit at Kent and Canterbury Hospital

Terry Boston-Marsh, a nurse and senior theatre practitioner at Kent and Canterbury Hospital, remembered for calm, kind nature

A nurse and senior theatre practitioner who was redeployed to help colleagues in intensive care has died after testing positive for COVID-19.

Terry Boston-Marsh, 54, who died on 29 January, worked in operating theatres at the Kent and Canterbury Hospital for 25 years before being redeployed to intensive care as part of the pandemic response.

Hospital team devastated at the loss of one of our own

East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust chief executive Susan Acott paid tribute to Mr Boston-Marshs work in intensive care and said his team at the hospital were devastated. He had quickly made his mark

Terry Boston-Marsh, a nurse and senior theatre practitioner at Kent and Canterbury Hospital, remembered for ‘calm, kind nature’

Nurse and senior theatre practitioner Terry Boston-Marsh, 54, died after redeploying to the intensive care unit at Kent and Canterbury Hospital
Terry Boston-Marsh

A nurse and senior theatre practitioner who was redeployed to help colleagues in intensive care has died after testing positive for COVID-19.

Terry Boston-Marsh, 54, who died on 29 January, worked in operating theatres at the Kent and Canterbury Hospital for 25 years before being redeployed to intensive care as part of the pandemic response.

Hospital team devastated at the loss of ‘one of our own’

East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust chief executive Susan Acott paid tribute to Mr Boston-Marsh’s work in intensive care and said his team at the hospital were devastated. ‘He had quickly made his mark there thanks to his calm, kind nature and his support of staff, patients and their families,’ she said.

‘Our heartfelt condolences go to his family and friends, particularly his team at the Kent and Canterbury Hospital, who are devastated at the loss of one of our own.’

Mr Boston-Marsh’s mother, Marlene Tupp, said her son had loved his job. ‘He loved working at the hospital, it really was his calling. He had recently received his certificate to mark 25 years there and he went out and bought a Westminster chiming clock to mark the occasion,’ she said.

‘Whenever he called I would hear it chiming in the background. Now I will never hear it again.’

Colleagues say he helped keep others’ spirits up

Mr Boston-Marsh had worked in day surgery and main theatres before moving to the ophthalmic theatre department, where he worked for many years. His colleagues paid tribute to his character.

Principal operating department practitioner Karen Amber said he was a much-loved member of the team and they were heartbroken by his loss.

‘He had a wicked sense of humour, but never at anyone else’s expense, and he helped to keep spirits up even in the most stressful of situations,’ she said. ‘We will remember him as a truly kind, funny man with a heart of gold.’

Specialty doctor in ophthalmology Rosina Zakri paid tribute to Mr Boston-Marsh on behalf of the hospital’s ophthalmic surgeons. ‘His loss leaves a hole that is impossible to fill,’ she said.

The latest figures published by the Office for National Statistics show that more than 250 nurses and healthcare assistants have died of COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic.


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