Nurse Awards

De-escalation plans minimise use of restraint

Winner: Four practice development nurses have been working to stop restraint from being a taboo subject and prevent incidents being mismanaged.

Practice Development TeamPractice Development Team. Picture credit: Tim George

The team has been shortlisted in the Mental Health category of the 2016 RCNi Nurse Awards for devising and introducing individual care plans to address violent behaviour and reduce the need to resort to restraint.

The nurse and individual work together to develop the person-centred physical intervention protocol (PCPIP), which identifies ways to reduce crisis behaviours and build a partnership between the nurse and patient.

This helps to minimise and manage violent and aggressive incidents, helping to de-escalate them at an early stage. The plans include how – when needed –restraint can be used in the most safe and respectful way.

A survey of ward managers found the plans were reducing the severity of challenging behaviours and giving staff more confidence in dealing with them.

Susan BurnsSusan Burns. Picture credit: Tim George

Senior practice development nurse Susan Burns says: ‘The plans go beyond legal requirements and meeting national initiatives. They facilitate a humane and individualised agreement about the way to bring a patient back to an equilibrium and to ensure they are kept safe.’

Specialist journal Mental Health Practice sponsors the award, and editor Colin Parish was on the shortlisting panel. He says: ‘The RCNi Awards are always a great platform for mental health nurses to show how they are using their skills and ingenuity to bring about meaningful change for the service users they work with.

‘This year’s entries are strong and demonstrate that nurses, as always, are doing their best in the challenging world or mental health care.

‘All the shortlisted nurses are touching the lives of the people they encounter and making a difference to their quality of life – they should all be immensely proud of their achievements.’

About the sponsor

Mental Health Practice logoMental Health Practice

Mental Health Practice is the most widely read journal in its field, and the only publication to cover all areas of mental health and patient care. Mental Health Practice provides a wide range of information that will enable you to develop creative and evidence-based approaches to your practice and stay informed about changes in policy and legislation. Subscribers can access a host of online resources including our archive that contains clinical and research articles dating back to 2000 and RCNi Portfolio, a simple and effective tool that helps you build, store and track your evidence for revalidation. Subscribe to the journal here.