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University dedicates nurse training centre to its first black sister

The University of West England in Bristol names new suite after Princes Campbell who died earlier this year after a lifetime of caring and community work

A training suite for nurses has been officially dedicated to the memory of Princess Campbell, the University of West Englands first black ward sister.

The new centre at the university's Glenside campus will be used by 180 nurses a year and recreates real hospital conditions; including life-sized mannequins which can be programmed to mimic pulse and temperatures of human patients.

Ms Campbell moved to Bristol from Jamaica in the 1960s and was made an MBE in 2011 after decades fighting prejudice and equality issues within the city. She died in September aged 76.

The university's head of nursing and midwifery Sarah Green said: Ensuring our nurses and midwives are well prepared for practice is all part of creating a skilled and value-based workforce for the NHS.

For many students it can be challenging the first time they are faced with new situations such as

Princess Campbell.  © Stephen Lewis

A training suite for nurses has been officially dedicated to the memory of Princess Campbell, the University of West England’s first black ward sister.

The new centre at the university's Glenside campus will be used by 180 nurses a year and recreates real hospital conditions; including life-sized mannequins which can be programmed to mimic pulse and temperatures of human patients.

Ms Campbell moved to Bristol from Jamaica in the 1960s and was made an MBE in 2011 after decades fighting prejudice and equality issues within the city. She died in September aged 76.

The university's head of nursing and midwifery Sarah Green said: ‘Ensuring our nurses and midwives are well prepared for practice is all part of creating a skilled and value-based workforce for the NHS.

‘For many students it can be challenging the first time they are faced with new situations such as breaking bad news, but the simulations allow them to safely practise these skills.

‘Students also appreciate the opportunity to learn in this way as it helps increase their confidence.’

NHS England head of patient experience Kath Evans opened the suite last week.

She said: ‘We know that the experience of care can improve our patient's physical and emotional wellbeing, so it's essential that nursing students have the opportunity to develop the way they interact with the children, young people and families that they care for.’

Nursing Standard published an obituary to Princess Campbell which you can read here.

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