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Online films highlight work of nurses globally

Three videos show vital care delivered by the profession 

The essential work done by nurses around the world is celebrated in three short films on the BBC's website.

The BBC teamed up with the International Council of Nurses (ICN) to produce the videos, which focus on the profession, the demand for nursing care, the different areas in which they work, and nurse migration.

' Nursing in numbers around the world' looks at the global distribution of nurses, the gender balance and their movement around the world.

' Saving childrens lives in the Central African Republic ' investigates the work of a nurses aide in the African country, which faces the challenges

The essential work done by nurses around the world is celebrated in three short films on the BBC's website.

The BBC teamed up with the International Council of Nurses (ICN) to produce the videos, which focus on the profession, the demand for nursing care, the different areas in which they work, and nurse migration.

'Nursing in numbers around the world' looks at the global distribution of nurses, the gender balance and their movement around the world.

'Saving children’s lives in the Central African Republic' investigates the work of a nurse’s aide in the African country, which faces the challenges of poverty and war.

The final film, 'Life as a cancer nurse in Gaza', highlights the work of a nurse in a conflict zone where resources, including electricity, are scarce.

The three films were part of the BBC's annual 100 Women season.

The BBC’s World Service radio programme, The Conversation, also joined in by featuring two nurses: Rose Kiwanuka, from Uganda, and Subadhra Devi Rai, from Singapore.

Ms Kiwanuka is Uganda's first palliative care nurse.

Ms Rai was the recipient of the 2015 Florence Nightingale International Foundation international achievement award for her work with refugees and victims of sexual violence around the world.

An ICN spokesperson said: ‘We are delighted that the BBC has chosen to select nursing, a predominantly female profession, to highlight the diverse roles of women around the world.’

 

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