News

ACAS publishes guidance on managing mental health at work

Employment relations organisation ACAS has produced a set of top tips to help employers promote positive mental health in the workplace

The Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS), the governments employment advice service, has published guidance for employers on supporting positive mental health in the workplace.

The guidance, issued to coincide with Mental Health Awareness Week, includes tips on how to identify and deal with mental health issues at work. It says employers should watch out for signs of depression or mental health problems among employees by observing any changes in their day-to-day behaviour.

According to the guidance: This could be uncharacteristic behaviour such as not being able to cope with their work, seeming distracted, a sudden loss in motivation or absenteeism. Look out for these signs as a potential warning that someone may be suffering from the early signs of depression.

ACAS also advises employers and managers on how they can help their staff. For example, if depression is caused by a problem in an employee's personal

The Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS), the government’s employment advice service, has published guidance for employers on supporting positive mental health in the workplace.

The guidance, issued to coincide with Mental Health Awareness Week, includes tips on how to identify and deal with mental health issues at work. It says employers should watch out for signs of depression or mental health problems among employees by observing any changes in their day-to-day behaviour.

According to the guidance: ‘This could be uncharacteristic behaviour such as not being able to cope with their work, seeming distracted, a sudden loss in motivation or absenteeism. Look out for these signs as a potential warning that someone may be suffering from the early signs of depression.’

ACAS also advises employers and managers on how they can help their staff. For example, if depression is caused by a problem in an employee's personal life, the employer should think about the changes they could implement to make things easier for them, such as flexible working. If the problem is work-related, they have the responsibility and control to help remedy it.

Senior policy adviser Adrian Wakeling said: ‘Mental health issues can affect people’s personal lives, wellbeing and morale at home. But it can also impact on their performance at work and be costly for organisations.’

Read the guidance on the ACAS website.

Employers and employees can also speak to an ACAS adviser by calling the organisation’s helpline on 0300 123 1100

Sign up to continue reading for FREE

OR

Subscribe for unlimited access

Enjoy 1 month's access for £1 and get:

  • Full access to nursing standard.com and the Nursing Standard app
  • Monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?