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Use of restraint and force: steps towards greater transparency and accountability

Ethical training plans and sharing people’s lived experiences of mental health services can only be welcomed
Restraint

Ethical training plans and sharing people’s lived experiences of mental health services can only be welcomed, writes Lee Hollins

On February 5, the Restraint Reduction Network (RRN) will launch a set of draft training standards developed with Health Education England to provide a benchmark against which all restrictive intervention training can be evaluated.

The standards cover training that has a restrictive intervention component and are designed to be applicable across health, social care and education.

They will become mandatory for all NHS-funded or commissioned mental health services in England, as well as services for people with autism, people who have learning disabilities and those living with dementia.

The standards have a focus on giving staff and carers the skills to prevent crisis and distress happening in the first place, and alternative responses to use when people are upset. They also

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