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Public Health England reveals latest figures for admissions of young people for self-poisoning

There were 26,293 hospital admissions in the year ending April 2018, with girls and young women the most likely to be admitted

The Public Health England report shows that more than 26,000 children and young people were admitted to hospital in England after poisoning themselves in 2017-18, with girls and young women the most likely to be admitted

More than  26,000 children and young people were admitted to hospital in England after poisoning themselves in 2017-18
Picture: iStock

Intentional self-poisoning by young people and children as young as ten resulted in more than 26,000 hospital admissions in the year to April 2018, according to a report from Public Health England.

Most admissions following self-poisoning were as a result of drug overdoses, but the report also reveals that other methods included swallowing bleach.

The report, Hospital admissions as a result of intentional self-poisoning by young people, 2013/14 to 2017/18, looks at trends in hospital admission in England by age.

It shows that admissions of girls aged 11 rose from 45 in 2013-14 to 77 in 2017-18, while those for boys aged 12 increased from 26 to 67.

Number of admissions as a result of poisoning fluctuated each year

There were 26,293 hospital admissions of children and young people aged 10-24 as a result of self-poisoning in 2017-18. Of these, 3,861 were aged 15, the peak age for admissions. The report states that there are steady rates of admissions into the early twenties.

Total numbers of admissions as a result of poisoning fluctuated each year – the figure for 2017-18 was higher than in 2016-17 but lower than that for 2013-14.

The report said that at all ages it covers, more girls and young women are admitted to hospital as a result of self-poisoning than boys and young men.


Find out more

Public Health England (2019) Hospital admissions as a result of intentional self-poisoning by young people, 2013/14 to 2017/18

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