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Seven ways to improve sleep on mental health wards

Collaborating with service users on sleep issues is crucial to care outcomes, says occupational therapist Jessica Oglethorpe
Picture is partial shot of woman’s face with her eye closed. Collaborating with service users on sleep issues is crucial to care outcomes, says occupational therapist Jessica Oglethorpe

Collaborating with service users on sleep issues is crucial to care outcomes, says occupational therapist Jessica Oglethorpe

  • There is growing understanding that poor sleep is a major contributor to mental health deterioration
  • Poor sleep may be a symptom of disorders such as depression, bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia
  • Dream Big project focuses on how to improve sleep for patients in an inpatient mental health ward

Sleep is an area of our lives that has received increasing attention in recent years as we understand more about how it interrelates with mental health. In our treatment of mental illness, the diagnostic-led view is that poor sleep is a symptom and consequence of disorders such as depression, bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia (Freeman et al 2017) .

However, there

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