Features

Living with… paranoid schizophrenia

Clare Wood describes her struggle with paranoid schizophrenia and encourages mental health nurses to be positive, encourage hope, show empathy and understand that recovery is unique for each service user
Picture of Clare Wood with her carer, Sandy. She describes her struggle with paranoid schizophrenia and appeals nurses to encourage hope, show empathy and understand that recovery is unique for each service user.

Clare Wood describes her struggle with paranoid schizophrenia and encourages mental health nurses to be positive, encourage hope, show empathy and understand that recovery is unique for each person

This article is about my experiences of living with paranoid schizophrenia. In writing it I had two aims: to educate mental health nurses about my own personal experiences of recovery, and to help myself.

Writing this has been a creative and therapeutic activity. I also believe that if people read this article and improvements to mental health practice are made, then I am making a valuable contribution to society.

Three most common symptoms of paranoid schizophrenia

My symptoms are as follows: hearing voices, paranoid thinking, depression, agitation, anxiety, lack of concentration, lack of motivation and social isolation.

The three most common symptoms are:

...

Want to read more?

Unlock full access to RCNi Plus today

Save over 50% on your first three months:

  • Customisable clinical dashboard featuring 200+ topics
  • Unlimited online access to all 10 RCNi Journals including Mental Health Practice
  • RCNi Learning featuring 180+ RCN accredited learning modules
  • NMC-compliant RCNi Portfolio to build evidence for revalidation
  • Personalised newsletters tailored to your interests

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs