Lessons from rejection

Being unsuccessful at a job interview can be disheartening but there is much to gain from the experience if you remain positive, seek feedback and learn from your errors

Being unsuccessful at a job interview can be disheartening but there is much to gain from the experience if you remain positive, seek feedback and learn from your errors.

Abstract

Finding out you did not get that coveted job can dent your confidence, but it is important to pick yourself up and learn from the experience, say recruiters.

Take some time to review your interview performance, suggests Nick Simpson, chief executive of specialist healthcare recruiter MSI Group. ‘Consider what you would have liked to communicate more effectively and, in hindsight, which response you could have improved.’

It is also crucial to review the parts of the interview that did go well. ‘Consider how you demonstrated your suitability for the role in specific responses, and see if you can improve how you did so for all of the questions you were asked,’ says Mr Simpson.

‘You should also take time to review any discrepancies between your skill set and those that were required; if there are any, look for ways you could address these.’

Asking your interviewers for feedback on your performance is another good way of improving your technique, says Michelle Brown, discipline lead for healthcare practice at the University of Derby’s Chesterfield Campus.

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This article was first published in print in Nursing Standard: volume 30, issue 30

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