Reviews

Book review: Behavioural Challenges in Children with Autism and Other Special Needs

Sarah Trute reviews Behavioural Challengers in children with Autism and Other Special Needs by Diane Cullinane.

Behavioural Challenges in Children with Autism and Other Special Needs

Diane Cullinane

WW Norton | 25.00 | 368pp

ISBN: 9780393709254

This book is systematic and clearly written, offering a fascinating insight to anyone seeking to work with and develop each childs potential.

Unlike typically highly-structured applied behavioural analysis, or positive behaviour support approaches, this text applies paediatric developmental theory to promote an understanding of, and reflection on, methods primary carers can use to support children with autism who present with behaviours that challenge.

It focuses on the relationship between the child and their caregiver and its strength lies in the skilled identification, understanding and application of specific approaches and its changeable child-centred practice.

The content offers a comprehensive and fascinating insight to a childs acquired learning framework and developmental skill sets. It does not, however,

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Behavioural Challenges in Children with Autism and Other Special Needs

Diane Cullinane

WW Norton | £25.00 | 368pp

ISBN: 9780393709254

This book is systematic and clearly written, offering a fascinating insight to anyone seeking to work with and develop each child’s potential. 

Unlike typically highly-structured applied behavioural analysis, or positive behaviour support approaches, this text applies paediatric developmental theory to promote an understanding of, and reflection on, methods primary carers can use to support children with autism who present with behaviours that challenge. 

It focuses on the relationship between the child and their caregiver and its strength lies in the skilled identification, understanding and application of specific approaches and its changeable child-centred practice. 

The content offers a comprehensive and fascinating insight to a child’s acquired learning framework and developmental skill sets. It does not, however, appear to lend itself easily to nurses to apply in practice, despite its strong theoretical evidence base. 

This is due to the lack of specific, measurable care planning goals, the need for sustained longevity of interventions required, and the programme’s adaptability to the child’s response. 


Reviewed by Sarah Trute, clinical/quality assurance team, Surrey and Borders Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
 

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