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The man who went to bed for a year

David O’Driscoll considers the concept of mid-life crisis and how it applies to people with learning disabilities.

David O’Driscoll considers the concept of mid-life crisis and how it applies to people with learning disabilities.

The Office for National Statistics recently released a report entitled At What Age Is Personal Wellbeing the Highest?, which generated a great deal of press interest. It claims that people aged between 40 and 59 have the lowest level of wellbeing of any age group.

The report and the media coverage made me think about people with learning disabilities and their mid-life experiences.

It is curious to me that there is plenty of research on other transitional periods in people’s lives, such as from adolescence to adulthood and adulthood to the end of life, yet there is nothing on mid-life.

Is this because researchers do not see people with learning disabilities and their experiences of mid-life as interesting or worthwhile research material? Or is it because many of the

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