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Personalised nursing student uniforms set to be all sewn up

University pays to have names of students embroidered on uniforms to enhance patient care

University pays to have students’ names embroidered on uniforms to help make personal connections and build relationships with vulnerable patients

A university has funded personalised uniforms for nursing students to help them provide care and get to know their teams.

Patients being cared for by Northumbria University’s nursing students can now easily see the name of their carer after the university paid to have names embroidered onto student uniforms.

Sewing scheme inspired by Dr Kate Granger’s #hellomynameis campaign

The sewing scheme follows a pilot study by the nursing and

University pays to have students’ names embroidered on uniforms to help make personal connections and build relationships with vulnerable patients

Chris Pointon (centre), husband of Dr Kate Granger whose 2013 campaign inspired the personalised uniform scheme, meets Northumbria University nursing students David Simpson and Alicja Kleysa
Chris Pointon (centre), husband of Dr Kate Granger whose 2013 campaign inspired the personalised uniform scheme, meets Northumbria University nursing students David Simpson and Alicja Kleysa. Picture: Northumbria University

A university has funded personalised uniforms for nursing students to help them provide care and get to know their teams.

Patients being cared for by Northumbria University’s nursing students can now easily see the name of their carer after the university paid to have names embroidered onto student uniforms.

Sewing scheme inspired by Dr Kate Granger’s #hellomynameis campaign

The sewing scheme follows a pilot study by the nursing and midwifery department, which was inspired by the #hellomynameis campaign that endorses names being clearly visible on uniforms to benefit students and patients.

Northumbria University senior lecturer in nursing Julie Derbyshire said: ‘We found that when students had their names embroidered onto their uniforms it helped them to make personal connections and build relationships with vulnerable people and co-workers.

‘We believe this simple, yet powerful, initiative can make a meaningful difference to compassionate, collaborative and safe care and can empower and enable both staff and patients.’

The #hellomynameis campaign was launched in 2013 by Dr Kate Granger and her husband Chris Pointon when Dr Granger was terminally ill.

Dr Granger became frustrated that many healthcare staff looking after her did not introduce themselves before delivering her care and decided to launch the campaign to make it easier for people to see the name of who is caring for them.

Inspired by the campaign, and in a bid to improve the experiences of students while on placement, the university’s nursing, midwifery and health department undertook a pilot study to see if having names embroidered on uniforms would be of benefit.

Clearly identified name badges on uniforms helped in emergency care settings

Nursing students will rotate on many placements in a variety of healthcare setting during their training and often will not be given a name badge.

The pilot found that having names visible on uniforms helped students to get to know their teams and also helped in emergency situations when they could be clearly identified and given instructions.

The success of the pilot programme has led Northumbria University to invest in personally embroidered uniforms for all first-year students on nursing, midwifery and healthcare programmes. They aim to roll it out to all health professional students in future.


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