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Social isolation: UK charity survey reveals acute loneliness among young carers aged under 24

Carer’s UK survey of more than 7,000 carers reveals 81% of those surveyed feel lonely and socially isolated.

Carer’s UK survey of more than 7,000 carers reveals 81% of those surveyed feel lonely and socially isolated


The charity Carer’s UK survey reveals that many carers would like to learn new skills
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Eighty one per cent of carers describe themselves as lonely or socially isolated because of their caring responsibilities, according to research.

The charity Carer’s UK carried out a survey involving more than 7,000 carers. It revealed loneliness is felt more acutely among younger carers under 24, is worse when someone is caring for disabled children; when caring is their main role; and when they care for several different groups of people.

The report refers to caring as one of the most important roles that someone can have in society, but acknowledges how all-encompassing it can be.

The charity urges health professionals to start a conversation with carers to break the silences and encourage carers to talk more about what matters to them.

Carers themselves said that regular breaks from caring is important so they can take part in leisure, educational or training opportunities, and be part of social events and activities.

They asked to be linked with other carers, so there is a shared understanding. Carers would like to be understood more widely too, in their own workplaces and among family members and friendship groups.

Stacey Atkinson is matron/manager-inpatient services for people with learning disabilities and lead nurse, St Mary's Hospital, Leeds


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