Inspired by patients

Director of nursing and quality at Lincolnshire Partnership Foundation Trust Anne-Maria Olphert says that helping to set up the first children’s intensive care unit in Leicestershire is the proudest moment of her career

Director of nursing and quality at Lincolnshire Partnership Foundation Trust Anne-Maria Olphert says that helping to set up the first children’s intensive care unit in Leicestershire is the proudest moment of her career. Here, she talks to Sophie Blakemore about the challenges of her current role, her desire to be a great leader and why she is happy to be a nurse.

Abstract

Why did you become a nurse?

I became a nurse in 1982. I remember seeing my grandfather sick in hospital and these wonderful ladies in immaculate uniforms nursing him, and thought I would like to make that much of a difference. It was one of the proudest moments of my life when I put on my uniform and, in those days, a cap and cloak.

What might you have done otherwise?

It is hard to imagine me doing anything else as I have only worked for the NHS, but I have thoroughly enjoyed the legal aspects of nursing and I would have liked to have worked in the judiciary system.

How and where have you developed your leadership skills?

I have been fortunate to receive a Florence Nightingale Nursing Leadership Award and a Winston Churchill Fellowship, which enabled me to attend a women’s leadership programme at Harvard and study end of life care in New Zealand. Many transformational and structural changes in the NHS have made me focus on ensuring everything I do is about being a great leader.

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This article was first published in print in Nursing Management: volume 23, issue 1

 

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