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2020’s year of the nurse and midwife offers golden opportunity to profession

The year of the nurse and midwife in 2020 gives the profession a chance to spotlight its achievements and have the maximum effect on healthcare worldwide

The year of the nurse and midwife in 2020 gives the profession a chance to spotlight its achievements and have the maximum effect on healthcare worldwide

Illustration shows three figures, the middle one standing on a mountain peak. The year of the nurse in 2020 gives the profession a chance to spotlight its achievements and have an impact on healthcare worldwide
Picture: iStock

Now the summer of 2019 has ended it may be timely to look ahead to 2020, designated the year of the nurse and midwife – an opportunity for the nursing profession to exert an effect on healthcare worldwide.

Endorsed by the World Health Organization and the International Council of Nurses, the year of the nurse and midwife, part of the Nursing Now campaign, is meant to improve universal healthcare by recognising what nurses can do and empowering them to affect the quality of future healthcare provision.

As a profession, nurses comprise almost half of healthcare workers in the world.

Providing a safe and caring environment that promotes health and well-being

Our scope of practice reaches far beyond what it was when Florence Nightingale was alive, and education was delivered based on the principles Miss Nightingale set down.

Yet the foundation of nursing – to provide a safe and caring environment that promotes patient health and well-being – has remained unchanged despite the ever-changing healthcare arena.

It is not surprising that nurses around the world contribute to the science of discovery, providing comprehensive, evidence-based care and delivering high-quality education to shape our future.

Imbalances remain on nursing’s scope of practice 

What is surprising is that as we live longer with chronic health conditions there are workforce shortages, and imbalances regarding the scope of nursing practice continue to exist around the world.

The Nursing Now campaign seeks to remove those barriers so that nurses can advance their knowledge and work to their full scope of practice, reducing confusion and ultimately improving global healthcare.

As autumn advances, think about how we can shine this spotlight to illuminate our past and present achievements so that all nurses can reach their maximum educational potential for the biggest impact on healthcare worldwide.


Rachel Lyons is associate professor at Montclair State University School of Nursing in Montclair, NJ, USRachel Lyons is associate professor at Montclair State University School of Nursing, New Jersey, US and a member of the Emergency Nurse editorial advisory board 

 

 


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