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Readers' panel: Have NHS staff been changed by the #Hellomynameis campaign?

In 2013, terminally-ill doctor Kate Granger created the #Hellomynameis campaign, drawing on her own hospital experiences to call on healthcare staff to introduce themselves to patients. Dr Granger died aged 34 on Saturday 23 July, five years after being diagnosed with cancer. Nursing Standard reader panellists discuss the impact of the #Hellomynameis campaign on NHS staff. 

In 2013, terminally-ill doctor Kate Granger created the #Hellomynameis campaign, drawing on her own hospital experiences to call on healthcare staff to introduce themselves to patients. Dr Granger died aged 34 on Saturday 23 July, five years after being diagnosed with cancer. Nursing Standard reader panellists discuss the impact of the #Hellomynameis campaign on NHS staff.


Jane Scullion (@JaneScullion) is a respiratory nurse consultant at Glenfield Hospital in Leicester
Jane Scullion
Jane Scullion

No one should interact with others without introducing themselves, yet many health care professionals forget this basic nicety. The #Hellomyname is campaign is simple and effective. It has changed practice because it reminds us of what we should be doing. Dr Granger made a difference because she was both doctor and patient and could see both sides.

To ensure this lasts, the campaign should be part of every health professional's induction package using Dr Granger’s own words and videos.


Liz Charalambous (@lizcharalambou) is a staff nurse at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust
Liz Charalambous
Liz Charalambous

Kate Granger’s campaign had a huge impact, reaching many people with her simple yet exceptional message. Her goal was achievable and humanistic, and in a high-tech age, it reminded staff of the fundamentals of respectful human interaction.

By sharing her personal journey with millions through social media, Dr Granger was able to articulate how urgent and necessary this was, and her campaign continues to inspire many people up and down the country. The impact of her legacy will be one of lasting change which will benefit so many people.


Daniel Athey (@danjathey) is a charge nurse on an acute medical unit at University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS trust
Daniel Athey
Daniel Athey

Whether it is a nurse racing through a drug round which is already late or a junior doctor working through a clerking list which is getting longer rather than shorter, it is easy for busy NHS staff to become desensitised to patient needs.

This campaign was a shift towards returning the human factor to care. What felt unique about it was the personal connection of its founder – Kate Granger was both a doctor and a patient attempting to drive change from the inside.


Jane Brown is quality governance manager, clinical support, at Worcestershire Acute NHS Trust
Jane Brown
Jane Brown

As nurses and clinicians, it was sad that we were not communicating with patients as well as we should have been. But this aspect of communication has changed so much for the better thanks to Dr Granger’s campaign.

We are now the ambassadors for the #Hellomynameis campaign, and will carry this on as we continually strive to improve communication in health care settings. This will be Dr Granger’s legacy – helping NHS staff achieve lasting change.

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