Editorial

Despite COVID-19 cancer nurses continue to do all they can for their patients

Caring, courageous and innovative work goes on amid the fear and grief
Picture of nurses with personal protective equipment

Caring, courageous and innovative work goes on amid the fear and grief

I was a nurse before I was a journalist and in my time in both professions Ive witnessed countless nurses making sacrifices on behalf of their patients.

Nursing attracts good people I dont think I was good enough and putting others first is what nurses do.

But until a couple of months ago, instances of nursing staff risking their lives to make sick people better seemed to occur only in war zones and faraway epidemics.

Recently things have changed. Death and its effects for those left behind has come closer, much closer. Yet it still seems utterly shocking that so many healthcare workers have died while doing their jobs.

UK healthcare mobilised its might against the pandemic

I was appointed acting editor of

...

Caring, courageous and innovative work goes on amid the fear and grief

Picture of nurses with personal protective equipment
Picture: BBC

I was a nurse before I was a journalist and in my time in both professions I’ve witnessed countless nurses making sacrifices on behalf of their patients.

Nursing attracts good people – I don’t think I was good enough – and putting others first is what nurses do.

But until a couple of months ago, instances of nursing staff risking their lives to make sick people better seemed to occur only in war zones and faraway epidemics.

Recently things have changed. Death and its effects for those left behind has come closer, much closer. Yet it still seems utterly shocking that so many healthcare workers have died while doing their jobs.

UK healthcare mobilised its might against the pandemic

I was appointed acting editor of Cancer Nursing Practice only a few short weeks ago, yet already those pre-pandemic days feel impossibly distant. COVID-19 was then a rumbling but remote threat and I was looking forward to immersing myself in the world you inhabit daily.

Then all that was turned on its head and UK healthcare was forced to mobilise its might against the pandemic.

Yet somehow, amid the fear and grief – and the fight for proper protective equipment, the extended lockdown, the desperate longing for ‘normality’ – life lurches on.

Beyond coronavirus, patients have needs and cancer care nurses continue to find innovative ways of meeting them – the Clatterbridge in the Community service, for example.

I took over this role from Kat Keogh, who now has another position at RCNi, and who in turn was covering the maternity leave of regular editor Jennifer Sprinks.

Jennifer is due back later in the year, when one can only hope the pandemic will be in retreat. In the meantime, I feel privileged to be working with you and look forward to hearing from you. I also hope sincerely that you all stay safe.


Picture of Daniel AllenDaniel Allen is acting editor of Cancer Nursing Practice

Want to read more?

Subscribe for unlimited access

Enjoy 1 month's access for £1 and get:

  • Full access to cancernursingpractice.com
  • Bi-monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal

This article is not available as part of an institutional subscription. Why is this?

Jobs