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Coping with body image changes after cancer treatment

Our series on how cancer affects different patient demographics focuses on women  
Chemotherapy

Our series on how cancer affects different patient demographics focuses on women

Women are less likely to get, and die from, cancer than men. More than half (54%) of women diagnosed with cancer during 2010 in England and Wales are predicted to survive for more than ten years, compared with 46% of men (Cancer Research (CRUK) UK 2014).

But issues such as infertility, increased health risks associated with early menopause, and concerns around hair loss and appearance change can affect women deeply, according to CRUK’s head information nurse Martin Ledwick.

‘Cancer treatment can affect the fertility of men and women, but while men can bank sperm relatively easily, it is a far more complicated and less reliable process for women to freeze eggs and preserve their

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