Career advice

A chance to sell yourself

A good CV should make the reader want to meet you. It should tell a compelling story that will make a potential employer want to find out more.

A good CV should make the reader want to meet you. It should tell a compelling story that will make a potential employer want to find out more. Picture credit: iStock

All CVs should have a personal profile. Think of the reasons why someone should hire you, then write a paragraph about yourself, and put it at the top of the page.

Your CV should not be just a list of jobs you have had, followed by brief summaries of the work you did and your education. Employers want to see your personality as well as your qualifications. Be positive – put yourself over confidently and highlight your strong points.

You might be a nurse with ten years’ experience, but how do your skills differ from those of countless other nurses ambitious for promotion? What is your place in the world of nursing that makes you special? To write ‘I get on well with people’ is meaningless unless it is backed up by example.

A CV should present you in the best possible light. Look on it as a way of marketing yourself. You need to sell your skills, personality, abilities, qualifications and experience to employers.

Employers might have a pile of 50 CVs from which to select five interviewees. If your CV is hard to read, unclear, badly laid out and containing irrelevant information, or it is simply too long, they will just move on to the next one. Make it easy for them to find the information they want.

And a word to the wise, do not let anyone else write your CV. On meeting you, employers can tell very quickly if it has been written by someone else.

If you need help in putting it together, take a look at the RCNi’s CV Clinic at www.tinyurl.com/rcncvclinic.

This article is for subscribers only

Jobs