Benefits of overseas electives

Play your part in a developing country’s health care while boosting your own nursing skills too, advises Chris Carter

Play your part in a developing country’s health care while boosting your own nursing skills too, advises Chris Carter.

Abstract

Clinical electives in developing countries can improve health through education, organisational support, advocacy, delivery of health services, and support to peers who are often working under great pressure.

As an army nursing officer specialising in intensive care and nurse education, I wanted to do an elective in a developing country to support my professional learning and to enhance my teaching of a postgraduate module, part of the BSc (Hons) in defence healthcare studies.

It is estimated that around .8 billion people worldwide do ot have access to surgery and the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery highlighted deficiencies in the provision of safe surgery in developing countries.

Read the article

This article was first published in print under the original title 'Opportunity to make a difference' in Nursing Standard: 26 August 2015, volume 29, issue 52.

This article is for subscribers only